As Britain lifts its lockdown, it’s vital our leaders admit their mistakes | Gaby Hinsliff

Each step we take towards normality is an experiment, and any wrong move must be acknowledged and retraced quickly

It’s hardly as if they weren’t warned. When Jacob Rees-Mogg first started threatening to bring back parliament in person, the risks – both to medically vulnerable MPs and to the public, if it turned politicians into unwitting super-spreaders – were spelled out very clearly to him.

But he pushed ahead anyway, and now we see the results. One visibly sweaty cabinet minister now self-isolating, and MPs travelling home wondering if they’re unwittingly bringing Covid-19 to their constituencies. And all to maintain an unconvincing fiction of life slowly returning to normal, while satisfying a popular demand that turns out barely to exist. Just 12% of Britons think MPs should have to vote in person in a pandemic, according to YouGov – which is remarkable given the depth of ill-feeling against politicians. Ending the remote parliament so soon looks like a mistake, and refusing to admit it bodes ill. 

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Each step we take towards normality is an experiment, and any wrong move must be acknowledged and retraced quicklyCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIt’s hardly as if they weren’t warned. When Jacob Rees-Mogg first started threatening to bring back parliament in person, the risks – both to medically vulnerable MPs and to the public, if it turned politicians into unwitting super-spreaders – were spelled out very clearly to him.But he pushed ahead anyway, and now we see the results. One visibly sweaty cabinet minister now self-isolating, and MPs travelling home wondering if they’re unwittingly bringing Covid-19 to their constituencies. And all to maintain an unconvincing fiction of life slowly returning to normal, while satisfying a popular demand that turns out barely to exist. Just 12% of Britons think MPs should have to vote in person in a pandemic, according to YouGov – which is remarkable given the depth of ill-feeling against politicians. Ending the remote parliament so soon looks like a mistake, and refusing to admit it bodes ill.  Continue reading…

Coronavirus outbreak, UK news, Sweden, Dominic Cummings, Politics

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