Alex Rider review – slick, silly fun with the teenage James Bond

Based on the adventures of Anthony Horowitz’s adolescent secret agent, this new series is an improbable, action-packed romp for all your escapism needs

Would you by any chance – I’m just hazarding a guess – be in the mood for a little light relief? Would you seize an opportunity for mindless fun that will not deplete your emotional or mental resources in the same way that engaging with the real world – where to ingest one minute of headline news is to hole yourself beneath the psychic waterline – unavoidably does?

You would? Good news – Amazon Prime recognises you and delivers unto you an eight-part adaptation of Anthony Horowitz’s bestselling Alex Rider books. This initial outing is based on the second book – Point Blanc – with the origin story from book one worked in so that we all know how an unassuming schoolboy becomes the keystone upon which the entirety of “a specialised subdivision of the British security intelligence service” depends. (Stormbreaker, the inaugural adventure, was presumably skipped over by the TV execs as a result of the deeply unsuccessful film version that was released in 2006. As it centres on a plot to release a deadly virus into schools, they must be on their knees thanking the god of bullets dodged.)

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Based on the adventures of Anthony Horowitz’s adolescent secret agent, this new series is an improbable, action-packed romp for all your escapism needsWould you by any chance – I’m just hazarding a guess – be in the mood for a little light relief? Would you seize an opportunity for mindless fun that will not deplete your emotional or mental resources in the same way that engaging with the real world – where to ingest one minute of headline news is to hole yourself beneath the psychic waterline – unavoidably does?You would? Good news – Amazon Prime recognises you and delivers unto you an eight-part adaptation of Anthony Horowitz’s bestselling Alex Rider books. This initial outing is based on the second book – Point Blanc – with the origin story from book one worked in so that we all know how an unassuming schoolboy becomes the keystone upon which the entirety of “a specialised subdivision of the British security intelligence service” depends. (Stormbreaker, the inaugural adventure, was presumably skipped over by the TV execs as a result of the deeply unsuccessful film version that was released in 2006. As it centres on a plot to release a deadly virus into schools, they must be on their knees thanking the god of bullets dodged.) Continue reading…

Television, Television & radio, Culture

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